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Equip Managers to Lead Through Informed Trust and Accountability

Shift away from excuses and blame by creating a culture of trust and accountability.

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Contributors

  • Craig Dowden (Ph.D.), Executive Coach, Keynote Speaker, and Author
  • Linda Galindo, Accountability Consultant, Keynote Speaker, Author and Executive Coach, Galindo Consulting Inc.
  • Ron Mack, Vice President of Human Resources, HSS Inc.
  • Sean Pomeroy, CEO, Visibility Software
  • Charles Precourt, General Manager, Propulsion Systems Division, Orbital ATK
  • David Robinson, Co-Founder and Partner, TRAC-Team, Mentor, Angel Investor
  • Mark Samuel, Author and Accountability Consultant, IMPAQ Corporation
  • Andy Thweatt, Southern California Operations Manager, Flyers Energy
  • Melodie Barnett, Managing Partner and Change Communicator, Pivot Communications Inc., Author, An Honest Living: Be Wildly Successful Without Being a Jerk
  • Kent Flint, VP, Human Resources, Real Estate Webmasters
  • Patti Gonzales, SVP HR & Accounting, Capital Farm Credit
  • Heather Hochberg, Senior Director & Executive Coach, Graham Holdings Company
  • Nadia Keshavjee, Global HR Director, Business for Social Responsibility Inc.
  • Kelly Pfeiffer, HR Manager, ADB Airfield Solutions
  • Nan Russell, Speaker & Author, Trust, Inc.
  • Bob Whipple, CEO, Leadergrow

Your Challenge

  • As a manager it can be challenging to trust your employees and relinquish control, but micromanagement creates an environment where employees do not feel trusted and as a result do not take accountability.
  • It is human nature to avoid blame and make excuses rather than taking accountability.
  • The inability to give trust or take accountability is often due to a lack of knowledge but also to a lack of will.

Our Advice

Critical Insight

  • Accountability is naturally associated with consequences, both positive and negative, but should be an avenue to foster positive relationships, develop key competencies, and create an environment focused around learning
  • Trust is a willingness to give up control due to a belief in the creation of a particular outcome, with consideration given to risk. This requires moving from paternalism to partnership. To put trust into action requires an informed approach to minimize the inherent risk in trusting others.

Impact and Result

  • Practical application of the Informed Trust Model increases employee empowerment.
  • Help leaders adopt an informed approach to trust with a comprehensive overview of each component of the Informed Trust Model: Assess, Give, and Verify.
  • Managers will understand how to empower their employees to take success into their own hands and take accountability for the results.
  • Managers will learn how to coach away from a mindset of blame and toward one of accountability.

Research & Tools

Guided Implementations

This guided implementation is a one call advisory process.

Call #1 - Discuss the training material and how to customize it with organization-specific processes.