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Create a Learning and Development Strategy

Transform your learning and development function from reactive to strategic.

  • Organizational leaders remain unsatisfied with the performance of their current L&D functions.
  • Employees are leaving organizations because they are not receiving the training and development that they were promised when they were hired.

Our Advice

Critical Insight

  • L&D can’t be all things to all people. It needs to be focused on proactively identifying and developing the critical learning needs that will enable the organization to deliver on their strategic objectives.

Impact and Result

  • Highly effective HR departments create programs that are deeply aligned with the strategic needs of their organizations. L&D departments need to do the same.
  • Involve key stakeholders from the beginning and perform a comprehensive needs analysis to understand the type of support from L&D that would be most valuable.
  • Create an L&D framework that details a vision, objectives, primary learning needs, employee groups, core delivery methods, measurement, and governance to ensure that your L&D function has a clearly articulated purpose and roadmap for the future.

Create a Learning and Development Strategy Research & Tools

2. Define the L&D framework

Identify the primary learning needs for priority employee groups in order to determine delivery method(s) and key accountabilities that will form the core of a governance model.

3. Create an action plan

Address gaps between the L&D framework and current state that will produce the greatest impact.


Learning & Development Strategy

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How to complete this course:

Use these videos, along with the Project Blueprint deck above, to gain an understanding of the subject. Start with the Introduction, then move through each of the Course Modules. At the end of each Module, you will be required to complete a short test to demonstrate your understanding. You will complete this course when you have completed all of the course tests.

  • Number of Course Modules: 6
  • Estimated Completion Time: 1.5 hours

Learning Outcome

Explain the process of creating a Learning & Development strategy, with a focus on creating and implementing strategic principles that will guide current and future learning initiatives.

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course, learners will be able to:

  • Describe the value a strategically aligned learning function brings to an organization.
  • Analyze their own organization to identify learning gaps and needs.
  • Explain the different considerations that guide the creation of L&D strategic principles.
  • Describe the critical steps involved in implementing an L&D strategy.

Course Modules

Now playing

Academy L&D Strategy: Introduction: Transform your Learning and Development function from reative to strategic

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Academy L&D Strategy: Module 1: Conduct a Needs Analysis

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Academy L&D Strategy: Module 2: Define the L&D Framework

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Academy L&D Strategy: Module 3: Measurement and Governance

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Academy L&D Strategy: Module 4: Identify Critical Gaps

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Academy L&D Strategy: Module 5: Create an Action Plan


Workshop: Create a Learning and Development Strategy

Workshops offer an easy way to accelerate your project. If you are unable to do the project yourself, and a Guided Implementation isn't enough, we offer low-cost delivery of our project workshops. We take you through every phase of your project and ensure that you have a roadmap in place to complete your project successfully.

Module 1: Conduct a Needs Analysis

The Purpose

  • Ascertain a vision, objectives, and strategic metrics for L&D.

Key Benefits Achieved

  • A defined L&D strategy project vision

Activities

Outputs

1.1

Clarify the strategic direction of the organization.

  • Organizational strategy clarified
1.2

Conduct a SWOT analysis.

  • SWOT analysis conducted
1.3

Identify insights for learning.

  • Major themes and critical issues identified
1.4

Create a vision for L&D.

  • L&D vision set
1.5

Define L&D objectives and identify strategic metrics.

  • L&D objectives and strategic metrics established

Module 2: Define the L&D Framework

The Purpose

  • Identify the primary learning needs.
  • Identify the core delivery method(s).
  • Create a standardized measurement approach.
  • Identify key accountabilities to form the core of a governance model.

Key Benefits Achieved

  • An L&D framework that clearly identifies the desired future state of the learning function

Activities

Outputs

2.1

Identify the primary learning needs.

2.2

Prioritize the primary learning needs.

  • Primary learning needs determined
2.3

Identify employee groups and create learner profiles.

  • Learner profiles created
2.4

Select core delivery methods.

  • Core delivery methods chosen
2.5

Outline a measurement approach for standardized evaluation.

  • Measurement approach for standardized evaluation outlined
2.6

Create a governance map.

  • Governance map built

Module 3: Create an Action Plan

The Purpose

  • Identify gaps between the current state and desired L&D framework.
  • Prioritize gaps that will have the most impact.
  • Create an action plan to address the priority gaps.

Key Benefits Achieved

  • Gaps in the L&D framework are addressed with an impactful strategy and action plan

Activities

Outputs

3.1

Examine integration with other HR practices.

  • Integration with other HR practices investigated
3.2

Identify gaps in L&D portfolio.

  • Gaps in L&D portfolio identified
3.3

Examine learning infrastructure.

  • Learning infrastructure examined
3.4

Assess L&D capability.

  • L&D capability assessed
3.5

Prioritize gaps.

  • Gaps prioritized
3.6

Create an action plan.

  • Action plan created

Create a Learning and Development Strategy

Transform your learning and development function from reactive to strategic.

Executive Summary

McLean & Company Insight

L&D can’t be all things to all people. It needs to focus on proactively identifying and developing the critical learning needs that will enable the organization to deliver on its strategic objectives.

Situation

  • Delivering effective learning and development (L&D) to employees is a key driver of bottom-line results; organizations with strong L&D programs are more profitable, more productive, and have greater customer satisfaction.
  • Today, the increased role that individuals play in creating value for organizations makes a focus on L&D even more critical.

Complication

  • Organizational leaders remain unsatisfied with the performance of their current L&D functions.
  • Employees are leaving organizations because they are not receiving the training and development that they were promised when they were hired.

Solution

  • Highly effective HR departments create programs that are deeply aligned with the strategic needs of their organizations. L&D departments need to do the same.
  • Involve key stakeholders from the beginning and perform a comprehensive needs analysis to understand the type of support from L&D that would be most valuable.
  • Create an L&D framework that details a vision, objectives, primary learning needs, employee groups, core delivery methods, measurement, and governance to ensure that your L&D function has a clearly articulated purpose and roadmap for the future.

Before starting this project

Be prepared to:

  • Gather information about the strategy and goals of the organization.
  • Speak with key senior stakeholders to understand their objectives and feedback on current L&D initiatives.
  • Work cross-functionally with functional leaders and other stakeholders in HR (including business partners and Talent Management leaders).

This blueprint is most helpful when:

  • The learning function is reactive, and the L&D leader wants to be proactive in identifying high-impact priorities.
  • Learning has been identified as a priority area for key stakeholders; use McLean & Company’s HR Stakeholder Management Survey to understand how your stakeholders see the function.

An L&D strategy includes the following:

  • Conducting a rigorous needs analysis that evaluates what learning will have the greatest impact on achieving the strategic goals of the organization.
  • Evaluating and updating how the L&D function operates and what activities it should be engaged in to best meet those priority needs.
  • Identifying gaps (in programs, infrastructure, and capabilities) that are limiting L&D’s ability to realize the desired future state, and creating a clear action plan to guide the function into the future.

McLean & Company Insight

There is no shortcut for a rigorous and planful needs analysis. Even though it is easier and less time consuming to skip the phase of gathering information from stakeholders, the L&D strategy needs to be grounded in a solid understanding of the organizational objectives and the potential obstacles to achieving them.

Learning drives bottom-line results

  • A higher spend on employee training is associated with higher profitability compared to organizations with lower budgets (Wells).
  • 94% of employees would remain at their organizations longer if the organization supported their learning and development. This increases employee retention and motivation (LinkedIn Learning, 2019).
  • 90% of employees agreed that training and development enhanced their job performance, which leads to greater productivity (The International Journal of Business and Management Research, 2019).
  • Increased organizational strength was measured when organizations offer formal growth and development programs (McGovern et al.). Organizational strength refers to how effective organizations are at achieving their desired outcomes.

People have become the core source of organizations’ competitive advantage, which increases the impact of effective L&D.

People and the intellectual property they create have replaced physical assets as the primary source of value for organizations.

A bar chart titled 'Components of S&P 500 Market Value' showing the growing ratio of 'Intangible Assets' to 'Tangible Assets' in percentages over time.(Johnson, 2020)

Today, L&D is more critical than ever, but it falls short of leaders’ expectations

60% of executives “expect that up to half of their organization’s workforce will need retraining or replacing within five years.”

28% of executives expect that “more than half of their organization’s workforce will need retraining or replacing.” (McKinsey, 2019)

Percentage of respondents who believe HR is highly effective at enabling learning & development:

  • 2020 — 48%
  • 2021 — 42%
  • 2022 — 41%
  • (McLean & Company HR Trends report database, N=378-805)

Despite the increasing need for employee development and training, fewer than half of organizations believe HR is effectively enabling learning and development, and this number is trending down year over year. This indicates that organizations want and need more from their L&D programs.

Employees’ expectations for L&D are also not being met

39% of employees cited a lack of opportunities for career-related skill development as a moderate, major, or primary reason for leaving their organization. (McLean & Company Exit Database, 2021; N=20,899)

Over one-third (35%) of new employees cite development opportunities as one of the most important factors in accepting a new position. (McLean & Company New Hire Database, 2021; N=29,995)

There is a gap between what employees expect for L&D when they join and the reality they encounter.

A cyclical diagram with 'Customer' at the center. In the 2nd tier are 'Employee', 'Advocate', and 'Candidate'. On the 3rd tier are 'Attract', 'Recruit', 'Onboard', 'Perform', 'Grow', 'Exit', 'Alumni', and back to 'Attract'.

Creating an L&D strategy improves overall L&D effectiveness and drives employee engagement

52% of HR departments that have implemented a holistic L&D strategy are highly effective, compared to only 31% of those that haven’t (McLean & Company 2021 Trends Report, N=425).

Effective L&D in turn drives employee engagement

ENGAGED EMPLOYEES
DISENGAGED EMPLOYEES
72% In the last year, the training I have received has helped me do my job better. 11%
70% In the last year, I have received an adequate amount of training. 13%
74% I am encouraged to pursue career development activities. 10%
(McLean & Company Engagement Database, 2018 to 2021; N=120,725, N=116,962, and N=149,992 respectively)

L&D needs to be aligned with strategic goals of the organization to be most effective

94% of leaders in high-impact learning cultures believe learning is aligned with the business plan (compared to only 49% of their peers).

Characteristics of highly effective HR (McLean & Company HR Trends Report, 2019. Characteristics were identified from statistical analysis of 907 responses.) —› L&D strategy
They plan for the future (using a minimum of a one-year strategic plan). —› Identify and map key actions for the learning function.
They offer a comprehensive portfolio aligned with organizational strategic needs. —› Align and focus resources on the most important learning needs.
They use metrics and analytics to develop insight-driven solutions and support decision making. —› Measure the impact on organizational goals and use data to drive continuous improvement.

“You can’t spend time and resources on courses that don’t focus on where the organization is going. If it is not supporting the strategic objectives of the organization, you have to ask yourself – why am I doing this?” (Siobhan Calderbank, Director of Learning & Development, Intelex Technologies)

To be successful, L&D also needs to be aligned with how employees like to learn

Only 19% of organizations seek to understand how their employees learn and what resources they need for successful learning in their role, and only 21% involve employees in the design of the learning approach (Daly & Ahmetaj, 2020).

Employees like to learn differently

58% of employees favor learning at their own pace.

68% of employees favor learning at work. (Leftronic, 2020)

Gen Z has different learning preferences compared to their peers.

43% of Gen Z respondents in a survey indicated that they favor self-directed learning (LinkedIn, 2019).

57% of Gen Z favor learning in-person and in a collaborative environment (Panopto, 2020). This is important as the increase in digital work and remote work environments continues.

Gen Z learners are more likely to value learning if it increases their job performance (69%), builds skills needed for a different function (47%), or enables them to find new internal jobs — more than all the other generations in the workforce (LinkedIn, 2021).

Aligning delivery methods with employees’ learning preferences encourages them to become continuous learners, which:

  1. Encourages adaptation
  2. Avoids narrow views
  3. Permits skill sharing
  4. Creates internal career growth opportunities
  5. (O’Neill, 2020)

Follow McLean & Company’s three-step process to create an L&D strategy

1. Conduct needs analysis

2. Build L&D framework

3. Create an action plan

Step 1

Conduct Needs Analysis

1. Conduct needs analysis

2. Build L&D framework3. Create an action plan
After completing this step you will have:
  • Formed an L&D steering committee
  • Identified a vision, objectives, and strategic metrics for L&D
  • Completed a comprehensive needs analysis

Form an L&D steering committee

Create a steering committee with stakeholders in the organization to assist with making decisions about the strategic direction of L&D. The committee will help set the vision, gather data, ensure strategic alignment, make connections, and ultimately champion the L&D strategy.

Stakeholders Role Why they are essential players
Head of HR/Head of L&D Lead: Drives the strategy creation process and brings stakeholders together. HR’s focus is on the people resources of the organization; they have a clear understanding of how and where the L&D function can support the business strategy.
Executive Team Participants: Provide strategic guidance and feedback and act as L&D strategy champions. The executive team sets the strategic direction of the organization. They know where the organization needs to be in the future and what skills are necessary for achieving the future state.
L&D or HR Team Participants: Give feedback that helps to shape the strategy. HR is familiar with L&D programs in place; they know what’s working and what isn’t and can provide insights into HR strategy.
Management Team/HR Business Partner (HRBP) Participants: Give feedback that helps to shape the strategy. The management team/HRBP has an on-the-ground perspective of what the current state of L&D is in the organization.
Employees Participants: Give feedback that helps to shape the strategy. The opinions of employees from varying levels and locations should be taken into consideration.

Review strategic documents and speak with key senior leaders

  1. Talent Strategy
    This document should identify the organizational priorities that HR supports and how it plans to do so. Fast-track through this step by reviewing:
    • Talent Implications: The requirements, effects, or consequences on talent due to the organizational direction.
    • Strategic Pillars & HR Outcomes: The vision for HR and what HR needs to accomplish to achieve it.
  2. Other Strategic Documents
    Every organization has several documents that define where it is trying to go and how it plans to get there. Review:
    • Organizational and functional strategies
    • Industry or competitor analysis
    • Annual reports
  3. Senior Leader Conversations
    These conversations clarify the strategic goals and provide feedback on L&D activities and areas where the leaders want greater support. Taking the time to have these conversations also builds relationships and allies who will champion L&D.

Use the L&D Strategy Interview Guide to conduct interviews with senior leaders.

Understand these four factors before proceeding

  • Organization Vision, Mission, Mandate —› What the organization aspires to be and what its purpose is.
  • Organization Strategy —› Goals the organization has set, capabilities it uses to achieve goals, the projects it wants to pursue – and how these three components support one another and are measured.
  • Senior Leader Needs/Expectations —› The expectations of key stakeholders that HR needs to deliver on through the L&D strategy.
  • External Factors —› Trends in the operating environment and industry that do, or could, have a significant impact on the organization.

Create a vision for L&D to make the scope of its activities clear

Questions to answer Examples of common answers
What are the primary outcomes we seek to influence?
  • Achieve strategic objectives
  • Manage or shift the culture
  • Improve employee engagement
  • Attract and retain talent by improving the employee value proposition
  • Minimize risk by delivering mandatory training
Are we current or future focused?
  • Ensure employees have the right skills to do their current jobs
  • Identify and deliver programs that help transform the organization
  • Prepare employees for future roles (in existing career paths)
Do we deliver training or facilitate knowledge transfer?
  • Develop and deliver programs aligned with learning needs of the organization
  • Provide the infrastructure that supports learning in the organization

McLean & Company Insight

The vision of L&D should not be to solve every knowledge gap or drive all development activities. It should articulate where the function is going and how it supports the long-range vision and goals of the organization.

Define clear objectives for L&D and identify strategic metrics

Review the results of your strategy document review and identify three to five objectives and two to four metrics for each. These will enable measurement at level 4 of the Kirkpatrick model (see appendix).

Document the vision and objectives in the L&D Strategy Presentation Template.

The L&D vision defines where the function is going. The objectives describe what needs to happen to achieve the vision. The metrics capture how success will be measured.
Create capabilities in the workforce that enhance or build competitive advantages required to achieve the strategic goals. Increase customer focus of organization to deliver products and services that create exceptional customer experiences.
  • Customer retention rate
  • Net Promoter Score
  • Average lifetime value of customers
Equip leaders of growth regions with tools to design and execute growth strategies.
  • Market penetration rates for regions
  • Expansion project milestones achieved on time/budget
See the appendix for instructions on how to measure L&D’s impact on these metrics.

McLean & Company Insight

If the connection between the objectives and strategic metrics isn’t clear, this may be an indicator that the vision and objectives aren’t properly aligned with the strategy.

Inventory current L&D initiatives

Learning initiatives are often scattered throughout the organization and contained in numerous formats. This exercise is not about L&D taking control over all content but ensuring alignment where required and limiting duplication of work.

  • Start with the learning management system (LMS) or other system of record but then look beyond that to other places where information is being shared within the organization. Identify the location of L&D content by reaching out to HR business partners (HRBPs), business line leaders, and subject matter experts (SMEs).

Information to collect

  • Name of L&D initiative
  • Learning objective(s)
  • Owner
  • Location
  • Cost
  • Participants
  • Delivery method(s)
  • Feedback on effectiveness

Benefits of L&D inventory

  • Identify content that already exists
  • Determine gaps or overlap in existing content
  • Understand where the L&D budget is currently being allocated and how much is left over for future initiatives
  • Define the level of standardization for L&D programs
  • Clarify the focus of current L&D initiatives
  • Establish the accessibility of learning content

Sample of the 'L&D Inventory' table on Tab 2 of the L&D Strategy Workbook.

Use Tab 2 of the L&D Strategy Workbook to capture the current L&D inventory information.

Gather existing data and feedback from systems currently in place

Examine survey data

Look for specific questions, metrics, or information related to L&D. Pay attention to what stakeholders are specifying as positive or negative about L&D to identify opportunities for improvement.

Surveys to examine:

Additional data and feedback may be available in:

  • Competency Framework(s): Competency frameworks provide a behavioral articulation of the knowledge, skills, and abilities required to achieve organizational objectives.
  • Learning Management System (LMS): Information about which courses employees are accessing and how they are performing will help identify the depth and breadth of competency gaps.
  • Strategic Workforce Plans: Critical roles, growth areas, and projected shortfalls all directly influence where strategic L&D activities should be targeted.
  • Performance Management: Low-scoring areas or common development goals will indicate areas of weakness.
  • 360 Feedback: High- or low-scoring areas will indicate areas of strength or weakness.
  • Succession Plans: Roles that employees are being developed for may require specific L&D programs.
  • Customer Feedback: Negative customer feedback indicates areas of weakness, skill gaps, and employee groups that L&D programs can target.

Speak with stakeholders at all levels to understand learning needs

Approaches for collecting information:

  • Focus group
    + Provides in-depth discussion and information from multiple sources
    - Time consuming, and group dynamic may affect information provided
  • One-on-one interview
    + Provides opportunity for an open and honest discussion
    - Doesn’t allow for consensus or provide opportunity to build on other ideas
  • Survey/questionnaire
    + Provides large amount of feedback from numerous stakeholders and can be completed when it is convenient
    - Response rates vary, limited questions asked, and all stakeholders need access to a computer

Determine appropriate approach based on:

Time constraints, resources, budget, and organizational culture

Questions should address:

  • Current challenges in their role
  • Skills and competency gaps affecting their team and the organization
  • Satisfaction with current L&D initiatives
  • Desired or missing L&D initiatives
  • Willingness to support new L&D initiatives
  • Preferred learning methods (online, facilitator-led, etc.)
  • Amount of time available for learning and desire for more or less dedicated time

McLean & Company Insight

Stakeholders can offer insight into not only what they need to know but also how and when they prefer to learn. Seek a deeper understanding of where learners are.

Customize the Standard Focus Group Guide using questions from the appendix to help conduct focus groups with stakeholders.

Examine the information collected and extract insights on the current state of L&D

Common insights include competency gaps, low-performing processes, challenges to particular objectives, satisfaction with current L&D offering, and issues in accessing learning.

Stakeholder Consultation

Data Sources
  • Senior stakeholder interviews, employee focus groups
Potential Insights
  • Competency gaps, challenges to achieving objectives, satisfaction with current L&D offering

Talent Management Data

Data Sources
  • 360 feedback reports, succession plans, performance management results, individual development plans
Potential Insights
  • Competency gaps, common development objectives, critical roles in need of development

Employee Surveys

Data Sources
  • Engagement, new hire, and exit surveys
Potential Insights
  • General satisfaction with learning and development opportunities, employee groups in need of increased development

Digital Learning Platforms

Data Sources
  • LMS, vendor platforms
Potential Insights
  • Most common courses being accessed, performance of current offering (scores and completion rates)

Document insights on Tab 3 of the L&D Strategy Workbook.

Step 2

Build L&D framework

1. Conduct needs analysis

2. Build L&D framework

3. Create an action plan
After completing this step you will have:
  • Identified the primary learning needs
  • Selected priority employee groups
  • Identified the core delivery method(s)
  • Created a standardized measurement approach
  • Identified key accountabilities to form the core of a governance model

Complete the L&D framework to define the future state of the function

The purpose of this framework is to identify the infrastructure required to deliver learning and development to the organization, not to make decisions on a program-by-program basis.

McLean & Company Insight

It is important to listen and involve key stakeholders, but the L&D framework should reflect a realistic vision of the function aligned with the strategic objectives of the organization rather than address everyone’s needs.

The L&D framework represented as a pillared building. The lowest base is 'Governance' with 'Measurement' layered on top, then three pillars 'Primary Learning Needs', 'Employee Groups', and 'Core Delivery Methods' hold up the roof 'Vision & Objectives'.

Completed in Step 1, the L&D vision and objectives identify the purpose of the function and the scope of L&D activities.

The primary learning needs will become the focus for the L&D function.

Core delivery methods reflect the primary tools that will be used to deliver learning (but this will not be an exhaustive list).

The employee groups identify employees that are the focus of L&D initiatives to address the learning needs.

Measurement will standardize metrics across the function to create an L&D scorecard.

Governance will define formal decision-making rights and processes.

Determine the primary learning needs that L&D will address An iconized version of the L&D Framework highlighting 'Primary Learning Needs'.

Review the insights from the current-state analysis and work through the following steps to identify the primary learning needs.

  1. Look for common themes across the insights from the current-state analysis.
      Example
    • Stakeholder interviews
      Poor progress on digital transformation priority
    • Performance data
      Low scores on change management capabilities
    • Employee focus groups
      Don’t understand why or how to use new systems
    • Common Theme: Change management
  2. Identify mission-critical issues that surfaced during the current-state analysis.
      Example
    • Stakeholder interviews
      Expansion in Asia requires experienced and capable leaders.
    • Critical Issue: Cultural competence in leaders
    • Performance Data
      Consistent cost overruns or late project delivery due to lack of project managers.
    • Critical Issue: Project management

McLean & Company Insight

Be aware of issues that can derail critical objectives or projects identified by the senior stakeholders. Just because an issue only appeared in one part of the needs analysis doesn’t necessarily mean it can be ignored.

Document themes and critical issues on Tab 4 of the L&D Strategy Workbook.

Determine the primary learning needs that L&D will address An iconized version of the L&D Framework highlighting 'Primary Learning Needs'.

  1. Translate themes and critical issues into high-level learning needs.
      Example
    • Theme
      Change Management
    • Learning Needs
      1. Manager training on leading change
      2. Individual contributor training on change resilience
    • Example
    • Mission-Critical Issue
      Foundational Management Competency
    • Learning Need
      1. Change management
  2. Document the learning needs on Tab 4 of the L&D Strategy Workbook.

  3. Prioritize identified needs against the L&D objectives.
    A sample of a 'Learning Needs Ranking' table from Tab 5 of the L&D Strategy Workbook.
  4. Use Tab 5 of the L&D Strategy Workbook to prioritize learning needs.

Identify employee groups related to primary learning needs and create learner profiles An iconized version of the L&D Framework highlighting 'Employee Groups'.

Examine each primary learning need and determine which employee groups it applies to.

  • If the answer is all groups, then learner profiles are not a practical solution, but if learning needs focus on targeted groups, take time to examine those segments and document how they like to learn instead of just what they need to know.

Learner profiles will ensure you are designing with the user in mind, improving the impact of the strategy.

  • The simplest approach is to create a profile for each level (individual contributor, manager, or senior leader) within the group.
  • A more advanced method is to look for traits that exhibit broad differences and create profiles for each variation. These can be driven by department, potential/performance, or demographics.

A sample learner profile in the Learner Profile Template with notes. 'Experts recommend naming the profile to encourage empathy, but at minimum, create a tag that explains who the profile represents.' 'Provide a brief list of distinguishing features for the profile group.' 'Review the focus group (or interview/ survey) results to understand the type of information this group is seeking and how, when, and where they typically go about finding it.' 'Review the focus group results to complete this section. You may need to gather some more information.'

Use McLean & Company’s Learner Profile Template to document the profiles.

Review options for core delivery methods An iconized version of the L&D Framework highlighting 'Core Delivery Methods'.

Core delivery methods will be the primary tools used to deliver learning to the organization.

  • The selected methods will help identify both the L&D function competencies and supporting technologies that will require investment.
  • Organizations can choose multiple core delivery methods, but it will come at the cost of additional resources and less economies of scale.
  • Blended learning is recommended at the program level; additional learning methods will still need to be built.
Reliance on Technology Technology Characteristics Typical L&D Capabilities
Formal digital
Structured online courses and materials (e.g. eLearning)
5/5
  • Content management
  • Audit/compliance capabilities
  • Reporting and analytics
  • Instructional design
  • LMS management
  • Vendor management
Informal digital
Online content that is not heavily influenced by instructional designers (e.g. curated learning)
5/5
  • Content management
  • Advanced search capabilities or content recommendations
  • Program management
  • Content management
Peer-to-peer
Facilitated programs that enable learning through social interactions (e.g. mentoring)
3/5
  • Collaboration and communication capabilities
  • Program management
  • Stakeholder management
  • Facilitator training
Face-to-face
In-person sessions on a particular topic led by a facilitator (e.g. classroom learning)
1/5
  • Recording or VR capabilities if remote audience
  • Instructional design
  • Facilitation
  • Scheduling/administration
Outsourced
Vendors deliver required learning (e.g. vendor-led classroom learning)
1/5
  • Vendor partners supply cloud solutions
  • Vendor management
  • Program management

Evaluate the following factors and select core delivery methods An iconized version of the L&D Framework highlighting 'Core Delivery Methods'.

Core delivery method(s)

  • Vision & Objectives
    Review the vision and objectives to identify if they reflect, or exclude, any of the options.
  • Learning Needs
    Review the L&D framework and evaluate the complexity (degree of difficulty), the uniqueness to each learner (degree of standardization), and the number/similarity of learning needs.
  • Organizational Culture
    Examine focus group results and the perspective of the L&D steering committee.
    Learning happens when people are comfortable. New and different methods should be rolled out over an appropriate period of time.
  • Employee Preferences
    Review learner profiles and evaluate learners’ ability to access technology platforms, the amount of time available for learning, the degree of colocation, and their desire for self-directed learning.

Record the selected core delivery method(s) in the L&D Strategy Presentation Template.

McLean & Company Insight

Selecting a core delivery method will help clarify requirements for technology, HR capabilities, and structure. It also helps reinforce that L&D is not responsible for all development activities (and should be aligned with the vision and objectives).

Outline a measurement approach that standardizes evaluation across L&D An iconized version of the L&D Framework highlighting 'Measurement'.

Measurement should be standardized to make reporting and analysis easier. Not all learning interventions require evaluation beyond level 1 of the Kirkpatrick model (see appendix); create guidelines to identify when higher levels of evaluation are required.

  • Different methods (for example, eLearning versus classroom) may require different questions, but when possible use consistent language to make the responses comparable.

Reaction

Select Standard Questions:
Sample Measurement
  • Participant satisfaction with the program
  • Participation rates
  • LMS reporting (course enrollment rates, completion rates, etc.)
  • Record measurement approach in the L&D Strategy Presentation Template.

Learning

Create Evaluation Criteria:
  • Identify triggers around delivery cost, hours spent learning, or strategic importance (e.g. related to leadership competencies).
  • If applicable, set a recommended standard for when tests are administered (before, after, three to six months following completion, etc.).
Sample Measurement
  • Pass rate (or average result) for training/average scores on tests
  • Difference between test scores administered immediately after and several months following
  • Feedback from participants

Behaviour

Create Evaluation Criteria:
  • Identify triggers around delivery cost, hours spent learning, or strategic importance (e.g. related to leadership competencies).
  • Choose a preferred evaluation method.
Sample Measurement
  • Average change in 360 feedback, self- or manager evaluation administered before and after training
  • Average change in performance review competency evaluation
  • Speak with managers and/or participants regarding impact of learning intervention on behavior

Determine required L&D governance An iconized version of the L&D Framework highlighting 'Governance'.

L&D governance refers to a set of decision rights and standard processes and can create better alignment with strategic priorities and increased efficiencies.

  • Evaluate three levels of activities when creating governance: strategy, design and build, and deliver.
  • Review the major players (e.g. steering committee, HRBPs, head of L&D, L&D professionals) and determine who will be responsible for what activities.
DESCRIPTION TYPICAL ACTIVITIES
Strategy Decisions that directly connect to the strategic direction of the organization
  • Typical timeline: one year or more
  • Selection of organizational learning priorities
  • Approval of organization-wide L&D curriculum
  • L&D scorecard review
  • Budgetary approval (and provision of funds)
Design & Build The process of creating learning interventions. This can also include certain strategic decisions at a line of business (LOB) or regional level.
  • Typical timeline: one to three months
  • Selection of external learning partners and technologies
  • Evaluation and approval of new learning initiatives
  • Creation of new learning initiatives
Deliver The activities involved in delivering learning to the organization
  • Typical timeline: daily to weekly
  • Delivery of learning initiatives
  • L&D data collection

Create a governance map to visualize the required structures An iconized version of the L&D Framework highlighting 'Governance'.

A governance map is a simple way of identifying and visualizing the scope of activities and decisions key players are accountable for.

Strategy Steering Committee
  • Selection of organizational learning priorities
  • Approval of organization-wide L&D curriculum
  • Budgetary approval
Head of L&D
  • Selection and management of LMS
  • Evaluation and approval of new learning initiatives aligned with organization-wide learning priorities
HRBP
  • Evaluation and approval of new learning initiatives not aligned with learning priorities
Design & Build
L&D Practitioner
  • Creation and delivery of learning initiatives
  • L&D data collection
Deliver

Ensure all major players are considered for inclusion in the governance map.

It’s typical for the scope of activities for some players to cross over levels.

In Step 3, you’ll evaluate additional actions (such as creating standard processes) and add them to the action plan if required.

For larger organizations, this is also an opportunity to define activities that will be delegated to LOB-level professionals.

Customize the governance map in the L&D Strategy Presentation Template.

Step 3

Create an action plan

1. Conduct needs analysis2. Build L&D framework

3. Create an action plan

After completing this step you will have:
  • Identified gaps between the L&D framework and the current state of L&D
  • Prioritized gaps that will have the most impact
  • Created an action plan to address the priority gaps

Create an action plan that will turn the L&D framework into reality

Use McLean & Company tools to make the process easier

Tab 6 of the L&D Strategy Workbook
Sample of the L&D Strategy Workbook, Tab 6.
Identify Significant Gaps
Compare the framework against the current state of L&D to identify gaps.
Tab 7 of the L&D Strategy Workbook
Sample of the L&D Strategy Workbook, Tab 7.
Prioritize Gaps
Use simple ranking criteria to prioritize the gaps and ensure actions will have the greatest impact on the organization.
Tabs 8 and 9 of the L&D Strategy Workbook
Sample of the L&D Strategy Workbook, Tabs 8 & 9.
Create an Action Plan
Identify L&D initiatives to address the gaps and create an action plan that assigns ownership and defines timelines.

This step will systematically walk through the framework and compare it to existing factors in the organization, including:

  • Alignment with other HR functions
  • Existing programs
  • Learning infrastructure
  • Standard processes
  • L&D team capabilities

Define or update organizational competency frameworks

A competency framework is a collection of knowledge, skills, attributes, and behaviors required by employees. Using competency frameworks to define critical behaviors ensures HR practices are working toward the same goals.

If your organization has a competency framework:

Use the results of your needs analysis and L&D framework to determine whether your existing competencies are representative of the competencies required for success in your organization. Assess if the competencies are:

  • Relevant to the work people actually do and to the goals of the organization.
  • Measurable so that the required behaviors can be assessed against a standardized scale (such as proficiency levels).
  • Something that can be developed in a person through training, experience, coaching, or other learning interventions.

If your organization does not have a competency framework:

Document this as a gap on Tab 6 of the L&D Strategy Workbook.

  • At a minimum, ensure that core competencies are in place. Leadership and functional competencies can be built on top of this.

See McLean & Company’s Develop a Comprehensive Competency Framework blueprint for more guidance.

If a competency framework is not an option, see the following slide for other actions to ensure alignment between HR functions.

Examine other HR programs for integration with the L&D strategy

Ensure alignment between the L&D strategy and other HR programs and functions to reduce duplication and create synergies.

Having a competency framework is the best way to achieve this. If a competency framework is not an option, review three complementary HR practices for alignment.

Performance Management
  • Employees should be evaluated against behaviors (articulated as competencies) that reflect the identified learning needs.
  • Consistent language should be used where appropriate to facilitate measurement of behavioral change following participation in a learning intervention.
Total Rewards
  • Reward and recognition programs should be designed to encourage and recognize behaviors (articulated as competencies) that reflect the identified learning needs.
Talent Acquisition
  • Candidates should be assessed against behaviors (articulated as competencies) that reflect the identified learning needs.
  • Recruiters should weave the L&D vision and objectives into communication of the employee brand and value proposition to candidates.

McLean & Company Insight

Ensuring HR practices are aligned with the L&D strategy sends consistent messages of behavioral expectations; misalignment may deter support of the new strategy.

Review L&D inventory and identify gaps or other required changes

  1. Identify current learning offerings that are aligned with the primary learning needs.
    Program GapsWhich prioritized learning needs will need net new content?
  2. Evaluate the current offerings against the chosen primary delivery methods and employee groups.
    Program ModificationWhat programs need to be modified to align with the chosen direction?
  3. Determine if any existing learning programs should be discontinued to free up resources or prevent conflicting advice.
    Program RemovalWhat learning offerings can be discontinued?

Is it worth keeping? Beware the endowment effect!

The endowment effect is a bias that causes people to place greater value on things that they own than is warranted, and it can impact people’s view of programs and processes as well. Be objective about which programs are not aligned with an identified need, and then evaluate the programs to identify resources (people and budget) that can be redeployed to a higher-impact activity.

Document any required changes on Tab 6 of the L&D Strategy Workbook.

Identify where current learning infrastructure is not able to support the L&D strategy

Evaluate these two pillars against existing technology and facilities Delivery Method Employee Group(s)

Technology

Can current technology adequately support the chosen deliverable(s)?
  • Ability to host content
  • Access requirements (e.g. mobile)
  • Reporting
  • Integration
  • Learning path creation
  • Individualization
Does the current technology accommodate the learning preferences of the chosen group(s)?
  • Interaction preference
  • Technology literacy
  • Remote support
  • Specialized work conditions or environment

Facilities

Is there appropriate space for the chosen deliverable(s)?
  • Building and communal learning spaces
  • Appropriate technology in learning spaces (e.g. projector)
  • Appropriate technology in learners’ locations (e.g. computer)
Is the space accessible to the chosen group(s)?
  • Distance from communal learning spaces
  • Remote connection infrastructure

If new technology or facilities are required to deliver on the L&D framework, document the gaps on Tab 6 of the L&D Strategy Workbook.

If your current learning management system is insufficient, review McLean & Company’s blueprint on LMS selection, Take an Educated Approach to Developing a Learning Management System Strategy.

Determine how the governance model differs from how work currently gets done

While the high-level accountabilities were determined in the previous step, additional work may be required to activate the chosen governance model.

Building out these elements will reinforce the chosen governance model, but it can also limit agility, so decide where they are needed based on the size and culture of your organization.

STANDARD PROCESSES

Standardizing certain processes can provide efficiency (limiting duplication of efforts) and better alignment with strategy (ensuring the right people are involved).

Core Processes to Evaluate
  • Requests for new training
  • Creation of new L&D programs
  • Selection of external partners
  • Approval of employee development budget spending

SUPPORTING DOCUMENTATION

Creating supporting documentation can clarify the roles of bodies in the governance model and help them be more efficient.

Documentation to Evaluate
  • Council or committee charters
  • Prescribed meeting agendas

ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

Revisiting roles and responsibilities will ensure employees understand what they are accountable for and ensure they are evaluated and compensated accordingly.

Roles to Evaluate
  • Any L&D positions that will have accountabilities added or removed due to the new governance model

Use McLean & Company’s Process Mapping Guide to map standard processes where they are required.

Document required changes as gaps on Tab 6 of the L&D Strategy Workbook.

Assess the function’s capability to deliver on the framework

Examine the framework and identified gaps to pinpoint where L&D capabilities will need to be enhanced through training, additional headcount, or strategic partnering with internal and external resources.

Assess capability by reviewing competency and capacity.

Competency – The combination of knowledge, skills, attributes, and behaviors required
Capacity – The amount of resources available, including people, time, and budget

Learning needs

  • Is there sufficient subject matter knowledge of the learning needs?
  • Is there additional budget and resources to address them?

Employee group(s)

  • Is the size of the targeted group(s) too large for the current team to support?

Delivery method(s)

  • Are new skills required to work with the selected method(s)? Can current resources (time and budget) be shifted?

Measurement

  • Is there sufficient data literacy to collect and analyze required data?
  • Does someone on the team have time to oversee this?

Governance

  • If L&D team members are being empowered to make decisions, do they need training?
  • Is training required for new decision-making processes?

Inventory

  • Are L&D team members able to develop required programs in the method selected?
  • Is the gap between the required learning initiatives and what exists too large for the team to fill?

Learning infrastructure

  • Do new technologies require new skills or knowledge to leverage successfully?
  • Is additional headcount or budget required to select and implement these tools?

Document the gap(s) on Tab 6 of the L&D Strategy Workbook.

Prioritize gaps to identify where action will have the greatest impact

Effort

Identify any investments required, additional HR capabilities needed, or current processes/practices that need to be modified.

When assessing the required efforts, be sure to include HR stakeholders. They have the best insight into the effort required.

Assign each gap an effort level:
  • Low effort: Minimal additional resources required; the L&D department has the capability to take on the initiative.
  • Moderate effort: Some investment required; some HR capabilities need to be built.
  • High effort: Investment is required, significant HR capabilities need to be developed, and new processes and programs need to be created and implemented.

Impact

Start broadly and determine if/how a gap will impact a strategic objective and associated metrics.

Evaluate how important it is to achieve an objective, if other initiatives depend on it, and the visibility of the outcome within the organization.

Assign each initiative an impact level:
  • Low impact: Addressing the gap will slightly or indirectly help achieve an L&D objective, and it isn’t a prerequisite for addressing other gaps.
  • Moderate impact: Addressing the gap helps achieve an objective or is required for another gap that will.
  • High impact: Achievement of an objective relies on closing the gap.

Use Tab 6 of the L&D Strategy Workbook to assess the effort and impact of all identified gaps to help select where action will have the greatest impact.

Create a roadmap of strategic L&D action items

Identify priority action items.

  • Identify high-level action items required to close priority gaps.
    • Is there any evaluation or analysis to be completed to establish feasibility?
    • Does a business case need to be created and approved?
    • Is training or hiring required?
    • Are new programs required?
    • Do certain processes require modification?
  • Keep the action items high level by focusing on the deliverable they will achieve.
Example
  • Gap
    • Technology doesn’t support delivery method(s)
  • Action Items
    • Define requirements for new technology solution
    • Create a business case and get approval
    • Select and implement new solutions

A Gantt chart is a simple tool to visualize and communicate your action plan.

  • However, various other methods like a priority list may be ideal for your organization.
  • The key is to create a simple visualization that will help with approval and communication of the strategy as well as updates on progress.
  • Regardless of the tool, ensure each action item has an assigned owner and targeted start and end date.

Sample of the L&D Strategy Workbook, Tabs 8 & 9.

Create and visualize your roadmap using Tabs 8 and 9 of the L&D Strategy Workbook.

Communicate the L&D strategy and action plan

Keep your audience in mind as you communicate your L&D strategy and action plan, and continuously emphasize the value each audience can expect to gain. The L&D strategy must be broadly communicated to ensure that stakeholders understand, buy into, and act in accordance with it.

A list of stakeholders to communicate with. 'Steering Committee' is at the top with arrows branching down to 'Senior Leaders', 'HR', 'All Leaders', and 'Employees'. Follow communication best practices. Ensure that communication is:
Timely
  • Provide warning before implementing any changes, whenever possible.
  • Communicate as soon as possible after decisions have been made and frequently to mitigate rumors.
Open and honest
  • Ensure that the information is truthful.
  • Be transparent; this is critical.
  • Don’t be afraid to say that you don’t know if asked a question you can’t answer.
Two-way
  • Incorporate feedback loops into communication efforts and invite stakeholder input.
  • Follow up on any questions that are asked.
Consistent
  • Communicate through multiple mediums, as people absorb information differently.
  • Ensure that messaging is consistent across departments, mediums, and presenters.

McLean & Company Insight

The process of creating an L&D strategy positions the function as a strategic partner focused on enabling the achievement of organizational objectives. Don’t miss the opportunity to champion the effort and share the success stories (and metrics!) that will come from this alignment to the organizational strategy.

Key insights

Insight 1

The rapid pace of change has amplified the need to identify and develop new competencies that will be required from employees. L&D can’t be all things to all people, and instead it needs to focus on proactively identifying and developing the critical learning needs that will enable the organization to deliver on its strategic objectives.

Insight 2

There is no shortcut for a rigorous and planful needs analysis. While it would be easier to skip the time-consuming phase of gathering information from stakeholders, the L&D strategy needs to be grounded in a solid understanding of the organizational objectives and the potential obstacles to achieving them.

Insight 3

It is important to listen and involve key stakeholders, but the L&D framework should reflect a realistic vision of the function aligned with the strategic objectives of the organization rather than address everyone’s needs.

Insight 4

Align HR practices with the L&D strategy to send consistent messages of behavioral expectations; misalignment may deter support of the new strategy.

Insight 5

The process of creating an L&D strategy positions the function as a strategic partner focused on enabling the achievement of organizational objectives. Don’t miss the opportunity to champion the effort and share the success stories (and metrics!) that will come from alignment to the organizational strategy.

Workshop Overview

onsite we will...

Day 1 Day 2 Day 3
Activities
L&D team
Functional leaders/SMEs
  • Clarify the strategic direction of the organization
  • Conduct SWOT analysis
  • Identify insights for learning
  • Create a vision for L&D
  • Define L&D objectives and identify strategic metrics
L&D team
  • Identify the primary learning needs
  • Prioritize the primary learning needs
  • Identify employee groups and create learner profiles
  • Select core delivery methods
  • Outline a measurement approach for standardized evaluation
  • Create a governance map
L&D team
  • Examine integration with other HR practices
  • Identify gaps in L&D portfolio
  • Examine learning infrastructure
  • Assess L&D capability
  • Prioritize gaps
  • Create an action plan
Deliverables
  • L&D Strategy Presentation Template
  • L&D Strategy Workbook
  • L&D Strategy Presentation Template
  • L&D Strategy Workbook
  • Learner Profile Template
  • L&D Strategy Workbook
  • L&D Strategy Presentation Template

Workshop Overview

Pre-work Post-work
McLean & Company Analysts
Client Data Gathering and Planning
  • Discuss participants, logistics, overview of workshop activities
Implementation Supported Through Analyst Calls
Discuss action plan items and prioritize blueprints for identified L&D initiatives
Client
  • Form an L&D steering committee
  • Collect organizational information including:
    • Mission, vision, and values statements
    • Organizational strategy documents
    • Culture statements
    • Talent data (performance management, succession planning, engagement, etc.)
    • Diagnostic survey data, if it exists, including HRSM, Engagement, New Hire, and Exit survey data
  • Conduct interviews with key stakeholders to clarify strategic objectives and challenges (Ask us how we can accelerate your pre-work)
  • Conduct employee focus groups to verify challenges and understand learning needs (Ask us how we can accelerate your pre-work)
  • Complete L&D initiative inventory
Execute projects required to complete the action plan

McLean & Company offers various levels of support to best suit your needs

DIY Toolkit

Guided Implementation

Workshop

Consulting

"Our team has already made this critical project a priority, and we have the time and capability, but some guidance along the way would be helpful." "Our team knows that we need to fix a process, but we need assistance to determine where to focus. Some check-ins along the way would help keep us on track." "We need to hit the ground running and get this project kicked off immediately. Our team has the ability to take this over once we get a framework and strategy in place." "Our team does not have the time or the knowledge to take this project on. We need assistance through the entirety of this project."

Diagnostics and consistent frameworks used throughout all four options

Research Contributors and Experts

  • Veronica Ambrosini
    Talent Management & Organizational Design Expert
  • David Hayden
    L&D Consultant
    CIPD
  • Lisha Van Leeuwen
    Leadership and Team Excellence Leader
    Roche
  • Linda White
    Vice President of Global Learning & Development (retired)
    Scotia Bank
  • Jan-Willem Bouwmeester
    Group Manager, Learning & Development, Master of Science
    Royal De Heus Group
  • Bill Goggin
    Director, Adult Education
    St. Francis Xavier University
  • Brett VanderHoek
    Manager, Talent
    Tolko Industries
  • Siobhan Calderbank
    Director, Learning & Development
    Intelex Technologies
  • Stephanie Kerr
    Director, Organizational Effectiveness
    Harley Davidson Motor Company
  • Dr. Iris Ware
    Chief Learning Officer
    City of Detroit

Several anonymous contributors were also interviewed.

Leverage Feedback to Drive Performance

Identify impactful initiatives using our diagnostic programs to collect feedback from employees, stakeholders, and the HR team.

Optimize the HR Department for Success

HR Stakeholder Management Survey
Align HR initiatives with business strategy and stakeholder needs.

HR Management & Governance
Improve HR’s core functions and drive project success.

Improve Employee Experience and HR Processes

Pandemic Engagement Pulse Check
Assess the effect of pandemic response plans on employee engagement.

New Hire Survey
Ensure recruiting and onboarding programs are effective by surveying new employees.

Employee Engagement
Move beyond measuring job satisfaction with a comprehensive view of engagement.

McLean Employee Experience Monitor
Evolve to leader-driven engagement with a real-time dashboard and results.

Employee Exit Survey
Understand why people leave the organization to proactively retain top talent.

360 Degree Feedback
Empower employees with a holistic view of their performance to prioritize development.

View our diagnostic programs for more information.

APPENDICES

Choose a method to determine the business impact of the L&D strategy

One of these three methodologies (Based on materials published by ROI Institute) will allow the actual impact of L&D on the strategic metrics to be determined. Even if these aren’t used, identifying those metrics still has value in helping to communicate the desired impact of the L&D strategy.

Trending

Compare business performance before and after implementation of the strategy. This works best when there are limited other factors that are expected to influence the metrics being measured.
Every department is capable of this method

Control Group

Use a control group to isolate the impact of the strategy. If possible, the two groups should share as many characteristics as possible (e.g. rather than compare two divisions, provide the training to half of the leaders in each division). Often a pilot group can be used to assess the impact.

Participant Estimation

Determine the monetary value of changes to business metrics (usually this conversion has already been done) and then ask participants to estimate the amount of change that they attribute to the program. Finally, ask them to estimate their confidence in the degree of impact and combine this information to determine the financial impact of the program.

Example of Participant Estimation Methodology:
  • Metric: Customer Retention
  • Change: + 4%
  • Monetary Value: $1,000,000
  • % Attributed to Program: 20%
  • Confidence: 70%
  • Impact: $1,000,000 X 0.2 X 0.7 = $140,000

Focus Group Guide questions for stakeholders

Customize the Standard Focus Group Guide using a selection of the questions below to help conduct focus groups with different stakeholders.

Questions Purpose and Comments
Have you experienced any L&D activities in this organization that have helped you in achieving your business goals? Any that were not helpful? Identify existing L&D activities in the organization that are effective and those that are not.
Is there anything missing from the current L&D offerings that could help you perform your role better? Identify areas of weakness that the L&D strategy should focus on.
How did you learn the skills to complete the required tasks in your current role? Identify how knowledge is transferred in the organization.
What challenges are you currently facing in your role? Identify opportunity areas for focus in the L&D strategy.
What skill or competency gaps do you see that are impacting the organization? Prioritize resources toward competencies that require the most development.
How do you like to learn (online, instructor led, etc.)? How do others on your team like to learn? Use learner preference information to inform the way L&D content is delivered.

Kirkpatrick’s Learning Evaluation Model

Measuring L&D Effectiveness

  • Level 4: Results

    To what degree targeted organizational or personal outcomes occur as a result of the L&D initiative.
  • Level 3: Behavior

    To what degree participants apply what they learned when they are back on the job.
  • Level 2: Learning

    To what degree participants acquire the intended KSAs (knowledge, skills, and abilities), confidence, and commitment.
  • Level 1: Reaction

    To what degree participants react favorably to the L&D initiative.
  • (J. Kirkpatrick & W. Kirkpatrick)

Works Cited

Daly, Jane and Ahmetaj, Gent. “Back to the Future.” Emerald Works, Feb 2020. Accessed July 2021.

Chelovechkov, Artem, et al. “2019 Workplace Learning Report.” LinkedIn Learning, 2019. Web.

Furstner, Greg. “Why 2020 Should be a Breakout Year for Training Productivity, and Engagement.” Forbes, 21 Aug. 2019. Web.

Godsey, Melody. “How Training Engagement can Boost Your Bottom Line.” eLearning Industry, 14 March 2019. Web.

Johnson, Matthew. “Ocean Tomo Releases Intangible Asset Market Value Study Interim Results for 2020.” Ocean Tomo, 22 Sept. 2020. Accessed July 2021.

Karim, Md. Mobarak, et al. "The Impact of Training and Development on Employees' Performance: An Analysis of Quantitative Data." The International Journal of Business and Management Research, vol. 3, no. 2, Feb. 2019, pp. 25-33. Web.

LinkedIn. “2021 Workplace Learning Report.” LinkedIn Learning, 2021. Accessed July 2021.

M., Maria. “28 Interesting Employee Training Statistics.” Leftronic, 4 Dec. 2020. Accessed July 2021.

Maryville University. “Importance of Training and Development for Employees.” Maryville University., 2021. Accessed July 2021.

McGovern, Joy, et al. "Maximizing the Impact of Executive Coaching: Behavioral Change, Organizational Outcomes, and Return on Investment." The Manchester Review, vol. 6, no. 1, 2001. Web.

McConnell, Megan and Bill Schaninger. “Are we long – or short – on talent?” McKinsey, Jan. 2019. Accessed Jan. 2019.

O’Neill, Emma. “Continuous Learning: A Guide for Your Business.” LearnUpon Blog, 21 Jan. 2020. Accessed July 2021.

Panopto. “They’re Coming: Rethinking Training and Development For Generation Z.” Panopto. 16 Jan. 2020. Web.

Phillips, Patricia Pulliam, Jack J. Phillips, and Rebecca Ray. Measuring the Success of Leadership Development: A Step-by-Step Guide for Measuring Impact and Calculating ROI. ROI Institute. ATD Press, 2015.

Resource Corner. “How Mentorship Drives Bottom Line Results.” Resource Corner. 2021. Web.

Wells, Susan. "HR Magazine, January 2001: Stepping Carefully." SHRM, HR Magazine, vol. 46, no. 1, 1 Jan. 2001. Web.

Zlatkov, Bogdan. “7 Surprising Insights About How Gen Z Wants to Learn.” LinkedIn. 14 Feb. 2019. Web.

About McLean & Company

McLean & Company is an HR research and advisory firm providing practical solutions to human resources challenges via executable research, tools, diagnostics, and advisory services that have a clear and measurable impact on your business.

What Is a Blueprint?

A blueprint is designed to be a roadmap, containing a methodology and the tools and templates you need to solve your HR problems.

Each blueprint can be accompanied by a Guided Implementation that provides you access to our world-class analysts to help you get through the project.

Need Extra Help?
Speak With An Analyst

Get the help you need in this 3-phase advisory process. You'll receive 4 touchpoints with our researchers, all included in your membership.

Guided Implementation #1 - Conduct a Needs Analysis
  • Call #1 - Identify project steering committee and discuss needs analysis.
  • Call #2 - Review results of needs analysis.

Guided Implementation #2 - Define the L&D Framework
  • Call #1 - Discuss elements of framework and implications of needs analysis.

Guided Implementation #3 - Create an Action Plan
  • Call #1 - Review action plan to verify timelines and identify related McLean tools.

Contributors

  • Veronica Ambrosini, Talent Management & Organizational Design Expert
  • Jan-Willem Bouwmeester, Group Manager Learning & Development, Maser of Science, Royal De Heus Group
  • Siobhan Calderbank, Director of Learning & Development, Intelex Technologies
  • David Hayden, L&D Consultant, CIPD
  • Bill Goggin, Director, Adult Education, St. Francis Xavier University
  • Stephanie Kerr, Director of Organization Effectiveness, Harley Davidson Motor Company
  • Lisha van Leeuwen, Leadership and Team Excellence Leader, Roche
  • Brett VanderHoek, Manager, Talent, Tolko Industries
  • Dr. Iris Ware, Chief Learning Officer, City of Detroit
  • Linda White, Vice President of Global Learning & Development (retired), Scotia Bank

Several anonymous contributors were also interviewed.